Discover your inspiration with Paradises, the premier travel experts to lands of unrivalled beauty.
Specialising in Asia & Pacific destinations,
we’ve partnered with the very best hotels to bring you the ultimate in holiday getaways.
Experience the richness of Asian culture and the beauty of the Pacific Islands as we transport you to some of the world’s most loved resorts.

Featured Deals

Explore Paradise

Select the areas of the world that interests you

Sabah

Malaysia, Asia

Situated on the beautiful island of Borneo, Sabah is one of the thirteen states of Malaysia. It is the second largest state in ...

string(2644) " Situated on the beautiful island of Borneo, Sabah is one of the thirteen states of Malaysia. It is the second largest state in Malaysia and shares the island of Borneo with Sarawak, Brunei, and Indonesian Kalimantan. Sabah is richly blessed with nature’s diversity, unique cultures, fun adventures, beautiful beaches, and fantastic cuisines for the adventurous tastebuds. From the world’s largest flower, the rafflesia, to one of the highest mountains is Southeast Asia, Mount Kinabalu, and one of the world’s top dive sites, Sipadan Island, Sabah has it all. Not only will you be amazed by the places to see and things to do here, you will also be treated with unique Sabahan hospitality. Explore the unique culture and tradition of Sabah and get ready to experience memories that will last a lifetime. Traditionally, Sabah’s economy was lumber dependent. However, with the increasing depletion of natural forests as well as ecological efforts to conserve the rainforest, palm oil has proven to be a more sustainable resource. Sabah also exports other agricultural products including rubber, cocoa, vegetables and seafood. Tourism, particularly ecotourism, is presently the second largest contributor to the economy. In the downtown area, you can get around quite easily on foot between hotels, restaurants, tour operators, markets, and the tourism office. For longer trips, taxis are readily available. Just 24 kilometres from Tawau town is Tawau Hills Park with sprawling grounds, lush green foliage and a sparkling river. It is a popular destination for visitors who want to experience nature at its best. Enjoy the rich vegetation of the park that changes as the altitude increases. There are plenty of hiking trails with some leading to a hot spring area and waterfalls. For a rich, cultural experience visit the Linangkit Cultural Village in Tuaran and meet the Lotud people, one of the 32 diverse ethnic groups in Sabah. Situated in Kampung Selupoh, approximately an hour’s drive away from the heart of Kota Kinabalu, the Linangkit Cultural village offers an indepth look into the social and cultural heritage of the Lotud people. The choice of accommodations in Sabah is endless. Sabah offers five-star resorts with the latest amenities and facilities to comfortable lodgings for the budget conscious. They all feature Sabah’s common aspect of warm hospitality. Signature championship golf courses surrounded by serene vistas, a world-class marina for sailing enthusiasts, and endless island accommodations are just few reasons that will ensure that every moment of your holiday is lively and fun filled. "
Upolu

Samoa, Pacific

The gateway to Samoa, Upolu is home to the international airport, the capital city, Apia, and the bulk of the country’s populati...

string(3096) "The gateway to Samoa, Upolu is home to the international airport, the capital city, Apia, and the bulk of the country’s population. Upolu’s coast is surrounded by white sand beaches and blue lagoons. One of Samoa’s most pristine beaches, Lalomanu Beach on the southeastern tip of the island with its translucent lagoon, is a protected marine reserve, teeming with a magnitude of tropical fish species and marine life. Just a little further north, head off to Namua Island and swim with the endangered green turtle in its natural ocean environment. South of Lalomanu there’s even more fauna to explore, including the seabird nesting grounds on Nuutele Island. From behind the hospital at Lalomanu you can take a short guided walk to an extinct volcanic crater, which happens to be home to a whole army of flying foxes. Upolu’s interior exudes a very special and mystic charm. There are numerous tracks that lead deep through lush rainforests to a number or rivers and dramatically beautiful waterfalls. O Le Pupu-Pui National Park contains Samoa’s highest mountain, Mt. Fito at 1100 metres as well as Togitogiga Falls and some good hiking trails. Papapapai-Tai Falls, with a 100 metre drop makes these very spectacular falls. The Papase’ea Sliding Rocks are just six kilometres southwest of Apia. Soft vegetation under the water makes it possible to easily slide down the falls into the natural pool below. The idyllic To Sua Ocean Trench attracts those keen to enjoy a surreal swim in a giant swimming hole. Samoa’s capital, Apia is home to 38,000 inhabitants. Situated on a natural harbour, just 40 kilometres from Faleolo International Airport, Apia is the perfect place to acclimatise to island life, pick up some souvenirs, and immerse yourself in the cultural heritage and proud history of Samoa. The colourful Maketi Fou (food market) on Apia’s Fugalei Street, is a good place to stock up on fresh fruit like pawpaws or a bunch of sweet little ladyfinger bananas. About a 10-minute walk from the food market is the flea market, the perfect souvenir haunt where you’ll find everything from clubs and kava bowls to lava lavas (the Samoan sarong), baskets, jewellery and authentic Samoan music. The famous Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, famed for classic books such as Treasure Island and Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, spent his final years in Samoa. He was known by the local people as Tusitala, Samoan for ‘teller of tales’. His beautiful mansion Vailima has been converted into a museum set within lush gardens and is open to the public. Visitors can also visit his grave located at the top of Mt. Vaea, along a trail named by the locals as “The Road of the Loving Heart”. The locals are famously hospitable and the city is easily explored by foot. Apia has a great nightlife, everything from busy pubs, nightclubs to cultural shows and excellent restaurants, where you can sing, dance and enjoy fresh Samoan cuisine. In addition to hotels in Apia there are some good resorts, guest houses and fales on the island."
South Kuta & Legian

Bali, Indonesia, Asia

The culture of multinational surfers, backpackers, wellheeled tourists, families and the forever friendly Balinese ensures South K...

string(2925) "The culture of multinational surfers, backpackers, wellheeled tourists, families and the forever friendly Balinese ensures South Kuta remains a unique place for tourists. The Kuta region is Bali’s largest tourist area and most visitors to Bali will visit it sooner or later. Centrally located, it is minutes from Denpasar and the airport. It offers a wide range of accommodation, a plethora of restaurants and tourist facilities in a buzzing atmosphere. Though Kuta isn’t for everyone, if you enjoy the beach and bar scene it is the best and most exciting place in Indonesia. Surfing is a hugely popular activity in Kuta with countless shops hiring out surfboards. Lessons and surf tours can be arranged as well. Australians once dominated the tourist scene however it is now much more diverse. French, English and Japanese tourists are all common and Kuta has become extremely popular with surfers the world over. Local activities include rafting, diving, bungy jumping and horseriding, which can all be organised through local travel agents. Waterbom Bali is hugely popular with children. It is supervised by lifeguards, and has assorted slides, pools and rides that the whole family will enjoy. Almost all hotels have a swimming pool and most will allow non-guests to use their pool for a small fee. Spa establishments can be found throughout Kuta for a true indulgence. Massages are available in most hotels but are much cheaper on the beaches. Kuta nightlife features music, arak (local alcohol) and happy hours that last all night. The busiest bars and clubs are along Jalan Legian, such as the new Paddy’s and the Bounty Ship. Merging almost seamlessly with Kuta to the south, is Tuban. It is a little quieter than Kuta but is thriving on tourism. Many tourists opt to stay in Tuban as it’s slightly further out from the epicentre of Bali yet still close enough to share all the facilities. It offers plenty of places to stay, eat and party. Tuban has colourful shops and markets as well as the larger Jalan Kartika Plaza and the Discovery Shopping Mall. Aside from all this, Kuta still remains a Balinese village with quiet compounds and small offerings to the gods left in every doorway. The culture of multinational surfers, backpackers, wellheeled tourists, families and the forever friendly Balinese ensure South Kuta remains a unique place for tourists. Legian The village of Legian was established as an alternative to Kuta and is now almost an extension of it with the two blending into each other along the main streets of Jalan Legian and Jalan Melasti. There is no shortage of places to eat in Legian, with roadside stalls (warangs) and restaurants in five-star hotels. Many exclusive hotels line the picturesque beachfront and its central location, burgeoning nightlife and accessibility to major tourist attractions make it a perfect alternative to Kuta. "
Micronesia Marshall Islands Diving & Snorkelling Marshall Islands

Micronesia, Pacific

Marshall Islands, also known as Majol is an island nation in the Central Pacific Ocean. There are more than 1200 islands and islet...

string(2834) "Marshall Islands, also known as Majol is an island nation in the Central Pacific Ocean. There are more than 1200 islands and islets in two parallel chains of coral atolls. Marshall Islands were settled around the beginning of the Christian era, some 2000 years ago by Micronesians. The islands were later sighted by a Spanish navigator in 1529. British naval captains explored the Marshall Islands in 1788 and did some mapping. More mapping was done by Russians in the early 1800s. U.S. and Hawaiian missionaries began efforts to convert the islanders in the mid 1800s, and even Germany had inf luence in the islands in the late 1880s. Japan seized the islands in 1914, and remained until the United States liberated the Marshalls during WWII. From 1947 to 1986, the islands remained under the jurisdiction of the United States. Then it became the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and remains friends of the USA with a Compact of Free Association. From 1948 to 1958, the US conducted nuclear tests on Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. The USA continues to be the protector of The Marshalls, and maintains a missile range and base on the island of Kwajalein. To get to the Marshall Islands, there are two major airlines f lying in daily, United Airlines and Nauru Airlines. Air Marshalls f ly routes between the Atolls in small commuter propeller planes. The only two islands that have an international airport are Majuro and Kwajalein. Boats are used to traverse between the atolls also. Government owned ships make scheduled trips between the islands, and other commercial cargo lines service the islands. Majuro has a commercial dock complex, and many of the outer islands have lagoons that ships can anchor in. Marshall Islands offers tremendous outdoor activities that are exciting, adventurous, and historic. The beaches are some of the most beautiful in the world and are surrounded by crystal clear water for swimming, snorkelling, and wildlife viewing. The water remains warm all year long. There are many historic sites from WWII scattered among the outer islands and day trips and longer excursions can be made to these sites from the capital city of Majuro. Other adventurous activities include joining in on year round cultural events and engaging with friendly locals. Visitors also enjoy shopping for local handicrafts with an array of beautiful baskets, jewelry and decorations. The islanders are known for their weaving using pandanus leaves, coconut fonds and shells. Throughout the Marshall Islands there are many choices for hotel or bed and breakfast accommodation. On Majuro you will discover a range or hotels with a variety of services and rooms. There are also many exciting opportunities to experience the outer islands and distant atolls and to meet the people of the Marshall Islands. "
Cambodia

Asia

Angkor Wat is the world’s largest temple complex, consisting of sandstone temples, chapels, causeways, terraces and reservoirs. ...

string(3911) "Angkor Wat is the world’s largest temple complex, consisting of sandstone temples, chapels, causeways, terraces and reservoirs. Vast and awe-inspiring, it is a magnificent Hindu temple set in dense jungle, located 152 kilometres from the Thai border, at Siem Reap. The walls are covered in thousands of carvings of gods and events from classical Hindu mythology. It was abandoned in the 15th century when the people turned to Buddhism and rediscovered in 1861. Elephant, Dangkrek and Cardamom mountains are in the southwest of Cambodia along the northern border with Thailand and the Eastern Highlands and in the northeastern corner are the three main mountainous regions. The majority of the population speaks Khmer, a non-tonal language closely related to Thai. French is the second language and English is taught in schools. Cambodia nationalities comprise of Chinese, Vietnamese and Cham Muslims. A form of Buddhism called Theravada is practiced by the majority of Cambodians, Animism and Caodaism are also practised. Capital and major centres Phnom Penh, the capital, has a population of around 1.5 million people and, despite its tumultuous past, its crumbling colonial architecture makes an attractive backdrop to streetside cafés and the redeveloped waterfront precinct. Peaceful Udong, 40 kilometres north of Phnom Penh, was the capital of Cambodia between 1618 and 1866. The town of Siem Reap is only a few kilometres from the temples of Angkor. Where to stay International standard hotels are available in Phnom Penh and Siem Reap, and Sihanoukville is growing in popularity as the only beach resort destination in Cambodia. Facilities are being developed and the general increase in tourism in Cambodia has led to a boom in guesthouse accommodation. Getting around You can hire a car with a driver with taxis easily found in the cities. The tuk tuk (three-wheeled motor cycles) cyclos and motos (small motorcycles) can also be flagged down for short trips. Buses also have an effective network and they make travel to sights around Phnom Penh easier than driving. For longer trips, trains are a longer but more comfortable option. There are also boats and the most popular services operate between Phnom Penh and Siem Reap. Fast boats head up the Mekong to Kompong Cham, Kratie and Stung Treng. Food and entertainment Khmer cuisine is similar to Thai and there are sidewalk noodle shops, food stalls and markets. It is wise to avoid eating or drinking from street vendors. The influence of the French is manifest in the breads and frogs’ legs sold in the markets, and tea and coffee are widely available. Tap water and ‘muscle wines’ are best avoided. There is a growing number of good restaurants, including Thai, Chinese, Indian, Malay and Western, both in the capital and in towns that attract tourists. Activities There are activities such as snorkelling in Sihanoukville and elephant rides in Ratanakiri and Mondulkiri, but you need a guide, as landmines, bandits, and other dangers make hiking, outdoor activities, or venturing off the beaten track, dangerous. There are many leisure activities in Phnom Penh such as go-karting, jet-skiing, mini golf and ten pin bowling. A network of national parks is being established, complete with visitor facilities; Kirirom, Ream and Bokor on the south coast are the most accessible and extremely interesting. Nature The number of national parks is increasing, but illegal logging has long been a problem. Parks include Bokor, on the south coast; Ream, near Sihanoukville; Kirirom, outside Phnom Penh; and Virachay, bordering Laos and Vietnam. Endangered species which are elsewhere extinct are thought to be hidden in the more remote habitats, including elephants, tigers, leopards, gibbons, bats, rhinos and crocodiles. Butterflies, snakes and birds such as cormorants, cranes and ducks are most common."
Suva

Fiji, Pacific

Welcome to Fiji’s capital and the largest and most populated city in the South Pacific. Unlike its more far-flung islands, Suva ...

string(3726) "Welcome to Fiji’s capital and the largest and most populated city in the South Pacific. Unlike its more far-flung islands, Suva offers a buzzing cosmopolitan atmosphere, brimming with colonial buildings, modern shopping plazas, a plethora of restaurants, farmers markets and entertainment, culminating in a truly exotic urban metropolis. Delve into the rich and diverse cultural influences that thrive here; a wonderful blend of Indian, Fijian, Chinese and Japanese culture. Full of history, Suva is well worth a visit when you land in Nadi before moving onto the other islands, to find out more about the island nation itself; from its remnants of colourful colonial architecture to the Fiji Museum showcasing the archaeological, linguistic, political and cultural history of the Fijian archipelago. For the foodies, Suva offers an eclectic range of dining spaces, from affordable cafes and hangouts, to fine dining restaurants. As the day turns to night, Suva boasts an admirable selection of bars and clubs, with the O’Reillys bar reigning as a popular spot amongst locals and visitors. For exploring the city, the Tropic Towers Apartments couldn’t be more convenient and affordable; great for families, business travellers, tour groups or holidaymakers, this is the perfect base from which to soak up all of the cultural, historical and cosmopolitan experiences you’re sure to have here. Convenience is the name of the game here, and Holiday Inn in Suva not only boasts harbour views, but is just steps away from the best of the city’s attractions. For those looking for an added grand touch, the captivating Grand Pacific Hotel gives guests a taste of colonial grandeur and impeccable service and is widely recognised as a gem of the South Pacific, delivering the wonder of old-world charm. There’s something for everyone in Suva.Suva is the capital of Fiji and is a beautiful harbour city built on a peninsula reaching out into the sea. The city is perched on a hilly peninsula between Laucala Bay and Suva Harbour in the southeast corner of Viti Levu. The mountains north and west catch the southeast trade winds, producing moist conditions year round. An exciting multi-racial city, Suva began as a late Victorian village with frame houses and stores along the beachfront. Much of its past still survives, for there are many small, quaint wooden bungalows in the old section that sit in juxtaposition to the modern offices and shopping plazas. On Sundays it’s well worth attending church to hear the choral singing that is magnificent. Most churches have services in English, but none compare with the 1000 strong Fijian service at Centenary Methodist Church on Stewart Street. A vital centre, Suva offers a great selection of restaurants including Chinese, Indian, traditional Fijian and European cuisine. There are tours to landmarks such as the Thurston Gardens next to Government House, the official residence of the president of the Republic of Fiji. The Fiji Museum is recognised as one of the best of its type in the South Pacific which holds a remarkable collection of archaeological material dating back 3,700 years and cultural objects representing both Fiji’s indigenous inhabitants and the other communities that have settled in the island group over the past 200 years. Not to be missed is the sprawling complex of municipal markets near the waterfront that comes to life on Fridays and Saturdays. Here you’ll find an assortment of artifacts and handicrafts for sale, made by Fijians throughout the Island group. For those who like history, there’s Albert Park where Charles Kingsford-Smith landed his plane Southern Cross on his trans- Pacific flight in 1928."

Hotel Partners

We partner with hotel chains across the globe to ensure a comfortable
stay wherever you travel!